bohemea:  V Magazine preview: Curves Ahead by Solve Sundsbo My goodness I love a curvy woman. This photoshoot is better than I could have ever dreamed, and I constantly imagine beautiful women with round curves and luscious long hair enticing me. This is just all sorts of magical though. Thank you for this gift, V Magazine. Thank you from the bottom of my big boob, soft tummy, thick thigh, rockin’ ass loving heart. ______________________________________________________________________________  Re-blog: I find that many individuals characterize woman such as the one shown about as “curvy” or voluptuous”. Some even go as far to label these woman as “chunky” or “overweight” But I think it is very important to note that our culture and the media have made the women’s ideal body into something unnatural. The media promotes bodies that are waif like and often emaciated. It sends us the message that unless we fit into the same size zero jeans and have the same perfectly sculpted abdominals, that we are inadequate. It distorts our perception of beauty. In reality, the woman featured above is not different because of her curves. She is not overweight.  She is NORMAL. She exemplifies the standard woman body. Women are SUPPOSED to have hips, thighs, and a waist so that they can bare children. It is ok for our skin to fold over when we sit or bend our body. WE NEED TO HAVE SOME FAT on our body in order to be healthy and insulate ourselves. Of course, remember that women come in all shapes and sizes. Some naturally larger and some smaller. Some big boned others small boned. Some with wide feet. Others with narrow feet. Some big chested and others flat. The women who are smaller are just as normal as those who are curvy. It is the pursuit of this unrealistic thin ideal which is unnatural and unhealthy, and very apparent. The most important thing is that whatever size and shape we come in, that we accept our genetic blue print. None is right or wrong. We cannot compare our bodies to those of others, because as human beings, we are so diverse. Remember that regardless, the our beauty is not defined by anything external. It is not defined by our curves or our thinness. Instead we are defined by the person we are inside; by our character, our attitude, our goals, our morals, and the way in which we treat others. These are the characteristics we want to be remembered for after we die. Not how we looked in a modeling advertisement. Not how we fit into a pair of jeans. We want to be remembered for how we made a difference in the world. For how we impacted someone’s life.

I find that many individuals characterize woman such as the one shown about as “curvy” or voluptuous”. Some even go as far to label these woman as “chunky” or “overweight”

But I think it is very important to note that our culture and the media have made the women’s ideal body into something unnatural.

The media promotes bodies that are waif like and often emaciated. It sends us the message that unless we fit into the same size zero jeans and have the same perfectly sculpted abdominals, that we are inadequate. It distorts our perception of beauty.

In reality, the woman featured above is not different because of her curves. She is not overweight.  She is NORMAL.

She exemplifies the standard woman body.

Women are SUPPOSED to have hips, thighs, and a waist so that they can bare children.

It is ok for our skin to fold over when we sit or bend our body.

WE NEED TO HAVE SOME FAT on our body in order to be healthy and insulate ourselves.

Of course, remember that women come in all shapes and sizes. Some naturally larger and some smaller. Some big boned others small boned. Some with wide feet. Others with narrow feet. Some big chested and others flat.

The women who are smaller are just as normal as those who are curvy. It is the pursuit of this unrealistic thin ideal which is unnatural and unhealthy, and very apparent.

The most important thing is that whatever size and shape we come in, that we accept our genetic blue print.

None is right or wrong. We cannot compare our bodies to those of others, because as human beings, we are so diverse.

Remember that regardless, the our beauty is not defined by anything external. It is not defined by our curves or our thinness.

Instead we are defined by the person we are inside; by our character, our attitude, our goals, our morals, and the way in which we treat others.

These are the characteristics we want to be remembered for after we die.

Not how we looked in a modeling advertisement. Not how we fit into a pair of jeans.

We want to be remembered for how we made a difference in the world. For how we impacted someone’s life.

Love is love.

There are no distinctions or rules.

Stop the hate.

Stop the discrimination.

Stop today.

And remember.

Remember the lives that were taken.

Remember the rights they have been denied simply because of who they choose to love

Because of who they are, inside.

Remember their stories:

________________________________________________________________________

I am the mother who is not allowed to even visit the children I bore, nursed, and raised. The court says I am an unfit mother because I now live with another woman.

I am the boy who never finished high school, because I got called a fag everyday .

I am the girl kicked out of her home because I confided in my mother that I am a lesbian.

I am the one working the streets because nobody will hire a transsexual woman.

I am the sister who holds her gay brother tight through the painful, tear-filled nights.

We are the parents who buried our daughter long before her time.

I am the man who died alone in the hospital because they would not let my partner of twenty-seven years into the room.

I am the foster child who wakes up with nightmares of being taken away from the two fathers who are the only loving family I have ever had. I wish they could adopt me.

I am not one of the lucky ones. I killed myself just weeks before graduating high school. It was simply too much to bear.

We are the couple who had the realtor hang up on us when she found out we wanted to rent a one-bedroom for two men.

I am the person who never knows which bathroom I should use if I want to avoid getting the management called on me.

I am the domestic-violence survivor who found the support system grow suddenly cold and distant when they found out my abusive partner is also a woman.

I am the domestic-violence survivor who has no support system to turn to because I am male.

I am the father who has never hugged his son because I grew up afraid to show affection to other men.

I am the home-economics teacher who always wanted to teach gym until someone told me that only lesbians do that.

I am the woman who died when the EMTs stopped treating me as soon as they realized I was transsexual.

I am the person who feels guilty because I think I could be a much better person if I didn’t have to always deal with society hating me.

I am the man who stopped attending church, not because I don’t believe, but because they closed their doors to my kind.

I am a warrior for my country serving proud, but can’t be my true self because gays aren’t allowed in the military.

I am the person who has to hide what this world needs most, love.

I am the person ashamed to tell my own friends I’m a lesbian, because they constantly make fun of them.

I am the who isn’t sure what she is. I am the who is rejected by her “best friends” because of a less-than-conventional crush.

I am the boy tied to a fence, beaten to a bloody pulp and left to die because two straight men wanted to “teach me a lesson.”

_______________________________________________________________________

The hate is real.

And so is their pain.

So let’s end it today.

Let’s make a change.

Show your support.

Wear purple.

And share the love.

Pain is temporary. Quitting lasts forever.

Can we eliminate poverty?  Yes.  We.  Can. Some facts:  The number of people living under the international poverty line of $1.25 a day declined from 1.8 billion to 1.4 billion between 1990 and 2005. The proportion of people living in extreme poverty in developing regions dropped from 46 per cent to 27 per cent. The World Bank estimates that the effects of the economic crisis will push an additional 64 million people into extreme poverty in 2010, and that poverty rates will be slightly higher in 2015 and beyond than they would have been without the crisis, mostly in sub-Saharan Africa and Eastern and South-Eastern Asia. About one in four children under the age of five is underweight in the developing world, down from almost one in three in 1990. Between 1990 and 2008, the proportion of underweight children under five declined from 31 percent to 26 percent in developing regions with particular success in Eastern Asia, notably China. Over a 25-year period, the poverty rate in East Asia fell from nearly 60 per cent to under 20 per cent. Poverty rates are expected to fall to around 5 per cent in China and 24 per cent in India by 2015. Southern Asia alone accounts for almost half the world’s undernourished children. In all developing regions, children in rural areas are nearly twice as likely to be underweight as those in urban areas. In contrast, little progress has been made in reducing extreme poverty in sub-Saharan Africa, where the poverty rate has declined only slightly, from 58 to 51 per cent between 1990 and 2005. The estimate of the number of people who will suffer chronic hunger this year is 925 million, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN — down from 1.023 billion in 2009, but still more than the number of undernourished people in 1990 (about 815 million).  There’s still a lot of work to do but poverty is something we can defeat.  Find out how you can help.

Can we eliminate poverty?  Yes.  We.  Can.

Some facts:

  • The number of people living under the international poverty line of $1.25 a day declined from 1.8 billion to 1.4 billion between 1990 and 2005.
  • The proportion of people living in extreme poverty in developing regionsdropped from 46 per cent to 27 per cent.
  • The World Bank estimates that the effects of the economic crisis will push an additional 64 million people into extreme poverty in 2010, and that poverty rates will be slightly higher in 2015 and beyond than they would have been without the crisis, mostly in sub-Saharan Africa and Eastern and South-Eastern Asia.
  • About one in four children under the age of five is underweight in the developing world, down from almost one in three in 1990.
  • Between 1990 and 2008, the proportion of underweight children under fivedeclined from 31 percent to 26 percent in developing regions with particular success in Eastern Asia, notably China.
  • Over a 25-year period, the poverty rate in East Asia fell from nearly 60 per cent to under 20 per cent. Poverty rates are expected to fall to around 5 per cent in China and 24 per cent in India by 2015.
  • Southern Asia alone accounts for almost half the world’s undernourished children. In all developing regions, children in rural areas are nearly twice as likely to be underweight as those in urban areas.
  • In contrast, little progress has been made in reducing extreme poverty in sub-Saharan Africa, where the poverty rate has declined only slightly, from 58 to 51 per cent between 1990 and 2005.
  • The estimate of the number of people who will suffer chronic hunger this year is 925 million, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN — down from 1.023 billion in 2009, but still more than the number of undernourished people in 1990 (about 815 million).

There’s still a lot of work to do but poverty is something we can defeat.  FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN HELP.

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