This week’s cover: thirty years on it looks as though AIDS can be beaten, if the world has the will to do so.

Not long ago, many believed that people living with HIV/AIDS could not be treated, that it was too complicated, too expensive. That notion has been proven wrong, as millions of people still alive thanks to treatment can attest.

Now, as world leaders gather at the United Nations for a global summit on HIV/AIDS, hanging in the balance will be the lives of the 10 million people who urgently need treatment. The latest science tells us that treating HIV not only saves lives, but also dramatically reduces—by 96 percent—transmission of the virus from one person to another.

Experience and research has shown we can both treat the virus and prevent it from spreading. What’s needed is the political will, the resources, and the commitment.

Join us in calling on world leaders to treat AIDS and #StopTheVirus.

Take action here: http://on.fb.me/kUsJkG

Reducing Pressure on HIV Services By Task-Shifting

In Malawi, MSF is working with the local health system to shift responsibilities from doctors to nurses and lay workers, in order to reduce pressure on qualified health staff.

In this 5-part video-clip series, MSF demonstrates tools and models that could help make improved treatment accessible to many more. Between 8-10 June 2011, world leaders will meet in New York to decide on the future of the millions needing treatment urgently. By sharing this video, help us spread the word that there is NO EXCUSE for governments to leave 10 million people untreated!

Bringing Treatment Closer To HIV Patients

In Malawi, MSF is cooperating with the local health system to bring care closer to where patients live.

“I remember when I first started treating people with antiretrovirals in Mozambique, people were so ill and weak as a result of their illness that they sometimes weighed so little they were often carried into the clinics by their grandmothers. But one year later, after starting ART, those same people were just walking into the clinic to ask for their pills themselves. It was amazing.” – Dr. Gilles Van Cutsem, MSF, South Africa

“Antiretroviral drugs have changed my life from negative to positive. I frequently used to get sick, and lost a lot of weight. Without these drugs I would not be on this planet. I have not had a single major health problem since I started taking them. They have saved my life.” – Luis Júnior Mariquele, Mozambique

“New scientific evidence shows that treating people with HIV not only fights their own illness but also stops the HIV virus spreading – in fact, the evidence is that people on antiretroviral treatment are 90% less infectious than those not on treatment. This opens up a whole new world where we not only treat the individual with ARVs but we can aim to reduce new infections at the community level too.” – Dr. Isabelle Andrieux-Meyer,HIV advisor, MSF Access Campaign

MSF is calling on world leaders to massively scale up HIV treatment at next weeks UN Summit on AIDS. Learn more.

Join us in the streets of New York City to demand that World Leaders keep their promise to treat AIDS and stop the virus.

June 8th is the first day of the United Nations High Level Meeting on HIV/AIDS. World Leaders will gather to announce their commitments to fight global AIDS.

Hanging in the balance will be the lives of the 10 million people who urgently need treatment, at a time when the latest science tells us that treating HIV not only saves lives, but also dramatically reduces—by 96 percent—transmission of the virus from one person to another. More info here.

Join us in the streets of New York City to demand that World Leaders keep their promise to treat AIDS and stop the virus.

June 8th is the first day of the United Nations High Level Meeting on HIV/AIDS. World Leaders will gather to announce their commitments to fight global AIDS.

Hanging in the balance will be the lives of the 10 million people who urgently need treatment, at a time when the latest science tells us that treating HIV not only saves lives, but also dramatically reduces—by 96 percent—transmission of the virus from one person to another.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s