thedailywhat:

RIP: Jackass star and CKY Crew member Ryan Dunn passed away this morning according to Bam Margera’s mother April, who reported the sad news on Preston and Steve’s radio show.
An officer with the West Goshen police department told NBC Philadelphia that Dunn crashed his Porsche into a tree near Route 322. He was 34.
TMZ is reporting that an additional, unidentified person also died in this morning’s crash. A photo posted to his Twitter account hours before the fatal accident showed Dunn drinking with some friends.
[nbcphil / tmz / photo: getty.]

RIP: Jackass star and CKY Crew member Ryan Dunn passed away this morning according to Bam Margera’s mother April, who reported the sad news on Preston and Steve’s radio show.

An officer with the West Goshen police department told NBC Philadelphia that Dunn crashed his Porsche into a tree near Route 322. He was 34.

TMZ is reporting that an additional, unidentified person also died in this morning’s crash. A photo posted to his Twitter account hours before the fatal accident showed Dunn drinking with some friends.

Following a rough 24 hours during which he received multiple death threats and had his Facebook page briefly removed, Roger Ebert took to his Chicago Sun-Times blog to kinda-sorta apologize for appearing to call the late Ryan Dunn a drunk-driving jackass on Twitter. “I was probably too quick to tweet,” Ebert writes. “That was unseemly.”

The famed film critic was lambasted by Dunn’s close friend Bam Margera, who called Ebert a “piece of sh*t,” and advised him to “shut your fat f*cking mouth.” Ebert responded by offering his sympathy to Dunn’s family and friends, but wouldn’t go so far as to retract his statement wholesale, pointing out that when Perez Hilton called his comment insensitive, the majority of Perez’s readers disagreed.

“I meant exactly what I wrote,” Ebert says, but notes that he “wasn’t calling Ryan Dunn a jackass,” merely “referring to his association with ‘Jackass’.” He concluded his statement with a reiteration: “Friends don’t let friends drink and drive.”

Walk-In Sculpture of Discarded Computer Parts by Marek Tomasik

meat prices rise

Meat Prices Rise 30% by 2013.

Food costs are going up across the board but it turns out the item that will hit consumers hardest will be meat.

Market experts are predicting that meat prices will skyrocket 30% in the next few years. This means that an average pound of ground beef will go from about $3.87 to over $5 per pound. This is largest increase that any of the food sectors will face.

Food prices fluctuate all the time but not like this and not under these sensitive global conditions. The usual reaction to a spike in commodity price is to increase production. Unfortunately, the meat industry is nearly maxed out on resource use and under the threat of global warming, increased meat production could send the planet into a downward spiral.

Committees are summits are being convened to figure out how to solve this mess when the simplest solutions are right under our noses. Stop eating meat. Break the news to people that they are going to have to eat more sustainably because the alternatives are $100 burgers or total global destruction.

The grain used to produce meat could feed 11 billion people. Let’s help the UN do the math: less meat production + the same level of grain production + effective distribution of food = enough to go around.

People More Dangerous Than Sharks

In the waters off the U.S. eastern seaboard, populations of many species of sharks have dropped by 50 percent and some have fallen by as much as 90 percent, said George Burgess, director of the Florida Program for Shark Research in Gainesville. Overall, nearly a third of all sharks and rays worldwide may be threatened with extinction.

This catastrophic decline is due in large part to commercial fishing of sharks. “The market for shark fins in East Asia opened up thanks to changes in their economy, increasing their ability to spend money on things such as shark fin soup,” Burgess said.

However, the biggest worry for sharks and their relatives, the skates and rays, which are suffering a similar fate, “is how they are killed incidentally when fishermen try and take other fish — the problem of bycatch,” Burgess explained. “They may be thrown back afterward, but they’re still dead.”…

(read more: Our amazing Planet)

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